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Avant-Garde Art \ Erik Satie - Dada Works & Entr'actes [LTMCD 2474]

A collection of Dada-related works by French avant-garde composer Erik Satie (1866-1925) including music used by Francis Picabia, Tristan Tzara, Kurt Schwitters and René Clair. An enthusiastic Dada activist in Paris between 1920 and 1924, Satie collaborated extensively with Tzara, Man Ray, Pablo Picasso and Jean Cocteau, wrote often in Picabia's journal 391, and was a sworn enemy of the Surrealist faction lead by André Breton.

Performed on piano by Bojan Gorisek, this unique selection includes Trois morceaux en forme de poire, performed by Satie in July 1923 at Tzara's notorious Soirée du Coeur à Barbe, and also Ragtime Dada, an extract from the ballet Parade performed at a series of Dada events staged by Kurt Schwitters and Theo van Doesburg in 1922

Dada Works also includes Satie's score for Entr'acte, Francis Picabia's dazzling multi-media 'instantaneist' ballet. Relâche dates from 1924, while Cinéma is Satie's music for the celebrated intermission film by René Clair. Both are arrangements for solo piano.

Tracklist:

1. Trois morceaux en forme de poire
2. Ragtime Dada
3. Relâche Pt.1
4. Entr'acte (Cinéma)
5. Relâche Pt.2

CD booklet includes archive images, writings by Satie for Dada journals 391 and Le Couer à Barbe, and historical notes by James Nice.

Dada Works & Entr'actes [LTMCD 2474]

Reviews:

"Here are the Satie (piano) pieces which relate to Dada is Paris, confidently and unpretentiously performed by Gorisek, and neatly rounded off with text by James Hayward. LTM's intelligent and detailed liner notes resemble miniature art catalogues, and only add to the historical value of the CDs in this series" (Westzeit, 03/2007)

"Highly recommended. There's an appropriately sprightly, trashy feel to much of this music. The main draw her is the ballet in two parts Relache, premiered just a few months prior to Satie's death. The first part is dominated by quirky, unlikely harmonic combinations, while the second sounds more overtly provocative as a venture into 'low' art. Nevertheless there;s still an element of disruption and dislocation lurking under the surface. Similarly Entr'acte (Cinema) opens with a superficially playful movement still underscored with an ominous sense of repetition and borderline discord" (BoomKat, 03/2007)

"These Dada works are hilarious" (Plan B, 02/2007)