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Ultramarine \ Companion (Every Man And Woman Is A Star Versions) [LTMCD 2352]

In 1991 electronic duo Ultramarine recorded their landmark album Every Man And Woman Is A Star to widespread acclaim. Companion offers an hour of complementary remixes, alternate takes and lost tracks from the parent album together with the 1992 spin-off EP Nightfall In Sweetleaf. Star remixers include Spooky, Sweet Exorcist (Richard H. Kirk of Cabaret Voltaire), Coco Steel & Lovebomb and Ultramarine themselves.

Tracklist

1. Intro
2. Weird Gear (US Remix)
3. Lights In My Brain (Spooky Remix)
4. Geezer (Sweet Exorcist Mix)
5. The Downer
6. Panther (Coco Steel & Lovebomb Remix)
7. Outro
8. My First Canoe Trip (unreleased)
9. Early Discovery (unreleased)
10. Saratoga (Remix)
11. Stella Connects (Edit)
12. Lovelife #1 (unreleased)
13. Nova Scotia (original version)
14. Old Geezer Dub (unreleased)
15. Pansy (Live at Glastonbury 1993)

Companion [LTMCD 2352]

Reviews:

"Faces you already love, from a slightly different angle" (Blissout, 05/2003)

"Refreshingly non-drastic remixes plus rare tracks, the best of which (Saratoga) is a divinely sashaying slice of jazz-funk tinged house" (eMusic, 10/2006)

"The soundtrack of choice" (Glasgow Herald, 08/2003)

"The tracks have a more dance-orientated theme to them, but are just as seductive and sublime as ever. Remixes of Weird Gear and Saratoga stand out, along with a live version of Pansy from Glastonbury '93. Summer on wax. You know you can't wait" (Careless Talk, 05/2003)

"Fills a unique niche between composed pop songs and meticulous, driving dance music" (The Big Takeover, 09/2003)

"For fans of the original album these versions are different enough to warrant investment, and add value to a landmark album" (Leonard's Lair, 06/2003)

"Companion contains remarkably little slack, and adds fresh dimensions to the already colourful originals. Indeed these versions of Weird Gear and Nova Scotia possibly better the original blueprint. Best of all, though, is the closing live take of Pansy. It's a lithe, ethnically infused rollercoaster ride that cocks a snook at fellow global beat travellers, with Jimmy Hastings making it clear that the Canterbury scenesters were anything but boring old farts" (Whisperin' & Hollerin', 06/2003)